ART Feed

Painting like Pollock, campers have fun

Paint like pollock kid abstract expressionist

"I wanted to give this class because I wanted to paint like Pollock with a group of people who want to paint like Pollock." This is how artist Kay Gering introduced her workshop students at a multi-generational cooperative camp in Ottsville, PA (ECRS) to the drip and splash technique of abstract expressionistic Jackson Pollock. Pollock pioneered the form in the 1940s and early 1950s. He was much more interested in the physical act of making art than the results on canvas, Gering explained. With dozens of colorful, acrylic house-paints donated by her contacts, Gering set her group out with cups, straws and sticks to create Pollock-like art on oversize white and black canvases and to over paint some smaller art reproductions. Your correspondent interviewed one participant, T, as she moved about the canvases, paint cup in hand. For her, the class had special significance. T recently attended the critically acclaimed stage production of the French produced "Pollock" in which her daughter starred as Pollock's ambitious artist wife, Lee Krasner. Watch campers, young and old, splash paint on large canvases in imitation of abstract expressionist artist Jackson Pollock.Paint like Jackson Pollock abstract expressionist artist

PHOTO ALBUM SLIDE SHOW HERE


Conservator demonstrates preservation techniques

Conservator demonstratres conservation techniques
At a preservation workshop through the Mount Airy Learning Tree, Free Library of Philadelphia conservator and private consultant Meg Newburger explained, often in hushed tones, the threats to books, paintings, ephemera and other treasured objects posed by aging and exposure to the environment and pests. Then she conducted a hands-on demonstration of the archival materials and methods for keeping our precious items intact for posterity, an art and science she had clearly mastered

Things are looking up! Paint the Cresheim Bridge! Open Call for Artists

 

Cresheim railroad bridge mural arts philadelphia

5/21/2018 UPDATE:  According to Brad Maule of Mt Airy USA, the selection committee is seeking additional submissions but anyone visiting the official website for the project http://mtairyusa.org/cresheimproject/ would not know that the deadline of April 13  for artist submissions has been extended.

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Before a couple dozen community members at the newly renovated Lovett Library this past Monday evening, Cathy Harris of Philadelphia Mural Arts issues a call for artists to design a mural for the rusted abandoned railway trestle over Germantown Avenue below Cresheim Valley Drive. First envisioned fifteen years ago, the project is being relaunched now that the City of Philadelphia is acquiring the former Pennsylvania Railroad trestle from PECO. Brad Maule of Mt Airy USA, a project partner, provided historical information on the structure and Mural Arts founder Jane Golden encouraged attendees to "spread the word" to artists to answer the "Call for Submissions." The Deadline for submissions is April 13, 2018. Your correspondent has posted a PDF of the "Cresheim Trail Mural Project Call for Submissions" here until it becomes available online from the collaborative which also includes the Trolley Car Diner, Friends of the Cresheim Trail (FoCT), Elfant Wissahickon Realtors, Chestnut Hill Rotary, the Mount Airy Learning Tree and ChestnutHIllPa. The abandoned railroad is being converted to a trail linking Mount Airy and Chestnut Hill with Springfield Township. See reporter Sue Ann Rybak's coverage in the January 18, 2018 Chestnut Hill Local The mural’s completion is intended to coincide with the opening of the extension to the existing trail which begins at Allens Lane and Lincoln Drive. In June the public is welcomed to vote "in several community locations" to choose a winner from among a handful of proposals narrowed down by Mural Arts. After the meeting, I approached Sam Hanna who had been intently taking notes during the presentations. As a business account manager for the Center for Employment Opportunities, Hanna planned to relay what he had learned to a client. While in prison for twenty years, that client began to do art. And after getting out last year at the time of the Monday evening meeting, was at a job he had just started. Things are looking up.

(In the photo left to right -standing:  Brad Maule of Mt Airy USA, Jane Golden and Cathy Harris of Mural Arts Philadelphia, seated 2nd from left- Sam Hanna of CEO and Judy Weinstein of MALT)

Video of public meeting by  Mural Arts collaborative in call for artists to submit design for old rusty railroad bridge in Mount Airy and Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia.


Boat built in six hours, from free seas to art gallery

Mare liberum free seas punt boat mural
Chloe Wang fell in love with the lower Schuylkill River after she put in the river down by Bartram’s Gardens. The boat was an English style flat-bottomed canal "punt" that she and other Haverford College students had just built earlier in the day during a breakneck 6-hour workshop led by the Brooklyn based activist artist boat-building collaborative, Mare Liberum, www.thefreeseas.org That was 2015. Now she works for Bartram’s Gardens in its community boathouse program. The initiative allows people to take out kayaks and rowboats on the river for free on Saturdays from April to October. Just this year the “punt” was pulled from storage and dusted off. Wang was invited by Mare Liberum to help paint a mural on the bottom depicting the river’s tides and the non-humans that inhabit the river environment for a new exhibit on the Hudson and Schuylkill rivers at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education. Painted on one side is a black silhouette of downtown Philadelphia, on the other the silhouette of the South Philadelphia oil refineries: both border the river. Your correspondent engaged Wang in the art gallery some minutes before the Center’s annual Richard James lecture, honoring its founder, which this year featured experts discussing “Water: Peril and Promise.” Watch video interview of college student who built then navigated canal boat,then painted mural on bottom for nature center gallery exhibit on rivers.


Making tiny wearable books -earrings and necklaces

Wearable tiny book earrings
Bookish but fashionable types may be seen wearing miniature book earrings or necklaces. At a workshop at the Free Library Northeast Regional Branch presented by Valeria Kremser, whose weekday day job is conserving rare books, participants like your correspondent and his wife learned how to create these miniature books approximately one inch square. They are true books with stitch sewn folios, endpapers, hard board covers and hinged spines. One of Kremser's most prized miniature books in her collection is from the Gutenberg Museum containing the Lord's prayer in seven languages. It measures about 1/8" square, is hand bound in leather with gold plating and Kremser notes, "comes in one of those little plexi boxes with a magnifying glass on top that swivels open." Watch how to make tiny wearable books - earrings and necklaces - here"

Violet Oakley musuem exhibit totally impresses her

Art teacher extols painter Oakley at Woodmere Museum
“She was a fabulous draftsman, designer composer - her compositions - the values the colors...!” Retired artist and teacher Aurora Gold expressed feeling overwhelmed (in a good way) by Oakley’s artwork while touring through an exhibit at the Woodmere Art Museum of high resolution photos of the murals Oakley created for the Pennsylvania State Capitol. Upon discovering Oakley’s American Renaissance style paintings when she was younger , Gold immediately fell in love with them and questions why in art school, she wasn’t introduced to Oakley along with the great masters. Gold has been visiting the Woodmere for more than 65 years and began bringing her art students from the Stephens Country Day School in Chestnut Hill to the Woodmere back in 1952. Upon overhearing Gold wax poetic about the work on display conversing with a companion, your correspondent shortly afterward coaxed Gold to be recorded describing her fascination with the artist and how impressed she was with Woodmere's exhibit. Watch video interview of artist teacher extol American Renaissance painter Violet Oakley.

Violet Oakley's Grand Vision Woodmere Art Museum

Paper-mache penguins not real, science is

Ceramic found object art penguins science real
Found object/ceramic artist Lisa Schumaier constructs whimsical and politically pointed raku and paper-mâché sculptures. In one, small paper cutouts with the faces of friends and family members pump signs up and down in front of a large paper-mâché Republican Party elephant. Originally, the figures were protesting the first Iraq war, then the second Iraq war and now they are about to find new purpose when Lisa adds pink pussy hats to some. She does projects with students and, in a subtle nod to the science is real movement, they’ve fashioned rolling soda can penguins 🐧, bobbing wire hanger penguins and affixed penguins to the base of one of the large scene installations Lisa has prominently on display in the hallway outside her studio with in Alexandria’s Torpedo Factory Artist Center. Watch video tour of artist's funny political protest art and interview.


Ceramicist makes lovely leaf trays

Ceramic artist plant leaf clay trays interview
Janell Petzko of Shady Hill Clayworks in Media, Pa makes lovely leaf-shaped ceramic plates by  rolling plant leaves directly into clay. She cuts out the shapes she wants and bisque fires the pieces with the leaves still on. After firing, just an ashy white skeleton of the leaf remains atop which gets dusted off. By applying a glaze and then sponging it off, the glaze caught in the crevices reveal the distinctive vein patterns of the leaves. She may then add additional colored glazes. In the winter she uses vegetable leaves such as large kale and pumpkin leaves. She will also use skunk cabbage leaves, ferns, bamboo and other grass leaves. From small begonia leaves she fashions ceramic refrigerator magnets, one of which is now attractively serving its purpose in your correspondent's home. Petzko's wares were on display for sale at the annual Water Tower December holiday craft show in Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, PA.

Inspired art teacher, inspired student art work

Art teacher clothesline exhibit
JS Jenks Academy for Arts and Sciences Teacher Jon Tietz is motivated to have his students produce good art. And to do that, he regularly integrates math concepts of patterns and perspective into student lessons and projects. He recently showed off eye-catching student works of art in a variety of media, some inspired by Greek classics, Alexander Calder or M.C. Escher, dramatically on display along the school's first floor corridor. Tietz has built 12 large collapsible wooden frames with horizontal wires for moveable clothesline type exhibits in the school. The frames can hold over 400 pieces, using front and back. When not in use, they are folded up and stored behind the auditorium stage. Walking down to his art room Tietz, pointed out the framed artwork along the stairway walls, part of the growing Jenks Art Gallery or "JAG," a reference to the school teams' mascot, the Jaguars.
Student clothesline art exhibit and video interview.

Costumed horses, riders parade for Halloween at Northwestern Stables

Horse rider Halloween costume contest parade
"Welcome to the Northwestern stables Haunted Horses Event 2017. Today we're inside because it's raining but it's still a lot of fun. As you can see we have pumpkin decorating here, we have cupcake decorating and then the feature of our event is always the horse and rider costume contest which I believe is starting soon! Northwestern Stables is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit. We do a lot of equine-focused programs for children and adults. We have a riding program. We have summer camp. We have two 4-H programs for young kids and big kids and invite people to come and tour the barns and learn to be friends with and not be afraid of our large equine friends." Kristen Kavanagh, Stables Board VP and leader, pumpkin decorating

Costumed horses, riders parade for Halloween